broken chain

Thou hast ascended on high, thou hast led captivity captive:
thou hast received gifts for [among] men; yea, [for] the rebellious also,
that the LORD God might dwell [among them.]

“So then after the Lord had spoken unto them, he was received
up into heaven, and sat on the right hand of God.” — Mark 16:19

“Wherefore he saith, When he ascended up on high, he led captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men.  (Now that he ascended, what is it but that he also descended first into the lower parts of the earth? He that descended is the same also that ascended up far above all heavens, that he might fill all things.) “– Ephesians 4:8-10

“God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time
past unto the fathers by the prophets,  Hath in these last days
spoken unto us by [his] Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things,
by whom also he made the worlds;  Who being the brightness of
[his] glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all
things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our
sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high;” — Hebrews 1:1-3

 

 

 


The Book of Psalms (Hebrew: תְּהִלִּים or תהילים; Tehillim; lit. “Praises”), commonly referred to simply as Psalms, is the first book of the “Writings”, the third section of the Hebrew Bible.[1]

 

The composition of the psalms spans at least five centuries, from Psalm 29, which is adapted from early Canaanite worship, to others which are clearly from the post-Exilic period. The majority originated in the southern kingdom of Judah and were associated with the Temple in Jerusalem, where they probably functioned as libretto during the Temple worship.[2]

[1] Mazor, Lea (2011). “Book of Psalms”. In Berlin, Adele; Grossman, Maxine. The Oxford Dictionary of the Jewish Religion. Oxford University Press

[2] Kselman, John S. (2007). “Psalms”. In Coogan, Michael D.; Newsom, Carol Ann. The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical Books. Oxford UNiversity Press.

 

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